Bailey and Potter, CPA

    We Work For the Employee

Email: info@job-rights.com

Telephone: 904-296-2328
Fax: 904-296-2341

For view of Map  Click  Here

For view of Building  Click  Here

Contact Us

 

Our office hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. After hours or on weekends or holidays you may leave a voice mail message for any of our staff or attorneys by calling (904) 396-2322.

Our fee arrangement for services depends on the case and cannot be determined until your situation is reviewed by the attorney. Although we do charge a fee for the initial consultation, our fee for this service is less than our usual and customary hourly rate. Currently, the fee charged for the initial consultation is between $85 and $125 per half hour, depending on the attorney.  Many of our cases can be accepted on a contingent fee basis so that no fee is paid unless there is a recovery.


Equal Pay and Compensation Discrimination...

The right of employees to be free from discrimination in their compensation is protected under several federal laws, including the following enforced by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, and Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The law against compensation discrimination includes all payments made to or on behalf employees as remuneration for employment. All forms of compensation are covered, including salary, overtime pay, bonuses, stock options, profit sharing and bonus plans, life insurance, vacation and holiday pay, cleaning or gasoline allowances, hotel accommodations, reimbursement for travel expenses, and benefits.

The lawyers at The Law Offices of Archibald J. Thomas, III, P.A. routinely handle claims involving unequal pay.  These claims are often asserted under one or more laws providing protection to the employee.  Since there are substantial differences among the various laws that protect employees in this important area, it is a good idea to consult a lawyer who can explain these differences and can provide guidance on the approach that is best in your particular circumstances.  Our lawyers will be able to anser any questions you may have about your rights prohibiting unequal pay.  Please contact us at info@job-rights.com to schedule a meeting with a lawyer or a telephone consultation to discuss your potential claim.

•  Equal Pay Act

The Equal Pay Act requires that men and women be given equal pay for equal work in the same establishment. The jobs need not be identical, but they must be substantially equal. It is job content, not job titles, that determines whether jobs are substantially equal. Specifically, the EPA provides that employers may not pay unequal wages to men and women who perform jobs that require substantially equal skill, effort and responsibility, and that are performed under similar working conditions within the same establishment. Each of these factors is summarized below:

•  Skill

Measured by factors such as the experience, ability, education, and training required to perform the job. The issue is what skills are required for the job, not what skills the individual employees may have. For example, two bookkeeping jobs could be considered equal under the EPA even if one of the job holders has a master’s degree in physics, since that degree would not be required for the job.

•  Effort

The amount of physical or mental exertion needed to perform the job. For example, suppose that men and women work side by side on a line assembling machine parts. The person at the end of the line must also lift the assembled product as he or she completes the work and place it on a board. That job requires more effort than the other assembly line jobs if the extra effort of lifting the assembled product off the line is substantial and is a regular part of the job. As a result, it would not be a violation to pay that person more, regardless of whether the job is held by a man or a woman.

•  Responsibility

The degree of accountability required in performing the job. For example, a salesperson who is delegated the duty of determining whether to accept customers’ personal checks has more responsibility than other salespeople. On the other hand, a minor difference in responsibility, such as turning out the lights at the end of the day, would not justify a pay differential.

•  Working Conditions

This encompasses two factors: (1) physical surroundings like temperature, fumes, and ventilation; and (2) hazards.

•  Establishment

The prohibition against compensation discrimination under the EPA applies only to jobs within an establishment. An establishment is a distinct physical place of business rather than an entire business or enterprise consisting of several places of business. In some circumstances, physically separate places of business may be treated as one establishment. For example, if a central administrative unit hires employees, sets their compensation, and assigns them to separate work locations, the separate work sites can be considered part of one establishment.

Pay differentials are permitted when they are based on seniority, merit, quantity or quality of production, or a factor other than sex. These are known as “affirmative defenses” and it is the employer’s burden to prove that they apply. In correcting a pay differential, no employee’s pay may be reduced. Instead, the pay of the lower paid employee(s) must be increased. Title VII, ADEA, and ADA Title VII, the ADEA, and the ADA prohibit compensation discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability. Unlike the EPA, there is no requirement that the claimant’s job be substantially equal to that of a higher paid person outside the claimant’s protected class, nor do these statutes require the claimant to work in the same establishment as a comparator.

Compensation discrimination under Title VII, the ADEA, or the ADA can occur in a variety of forms. For example:

An employer pays an employee with a disability less than similarly situated employees without disabilities and the employer’s explanation (if any) does not satisfactorily account for the differential.

An employer sets the compensation for jobs predominately held by, for example, women or African Americans below that suggested by the employer’s job evaluation study, while the pay for jobs predominately held by men or whites is consistent with the level suggested by the job evaluation study.

An employer maintains a neutral compensation policy or practice that has an adverse impact on employees in a protected class and cannot be justified as job related and consistent with business necessity. For example, if an employer provides extra compensation to employees who are the “head of household,” i.e., married with dependents and the primary financial contributor to the household, the practice may have an unlawful disparate impact on women.

It is also unlawful to retaliate against an individual for opposing employment practices that discriminate based on compensation or for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under Title VII, ADEA, ADA or the Equal Pay Act.

If you have been the victim of retaliation for complaining about unequal pay or failure to pay overtime compensation, our lawyers will be able to assist you in deciding the proper course of action.  Please call us at 904-396-2322 to talk with one of our lawyers.


Our employment law attorneys represent employees throughout Florida and south and central Georgia, including the cities of: Orlando, Daytona Beach, Melbourne, Titusville, Naples, Ft. Meyers, Tampa, St. Petersburg, Clearwater, Sarasota, Gainesville, Jacksonville, Orange Park, St. Augustine, Port St. Lucie, Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Tallahassee, Lake City, Ocala, Pensacola, Atlanta, Brunswick, Savannah, and Kings Bay. Our employment lawyers also represent employees in the following counties: Duval County, St. Johns County, Alachua County, Clay County, Nassau County, Orange County, Hillsborough County, Pinellas County, Marion County, Volusia County, Brevard County, Polk County, Broward County, Fulton County, DeKalb County, Camden County, Chatham County and Glynn County. Whether you need a Florida overtime lawyer, Florida wrongful termination attorney, Florida discrimination lawyer or a Jacksonville retaliation case lawyer, we can help.

copyright 2010 All rights reserved   Web Site Design by The Remington Agency